Neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow: ‘Changing the way that you think is cognitively costly’

Neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow: ‘Changing the way that you think is cognitively costly’

Neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow: ‘Changing the way that you think is cognitively costly’ 150 150 icnagency

By: Ian Tucker | Neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow: ‘Changing the way that you think is cognitively costly’ | Neuroscience | The Guardian

In her new book, the scientist examines the role of fate in our lives, how our politics are formed and sniffing out Mr Right

Dr Hannah Critchlow is a neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge. Her debut book, The Science of Fate, examines how much of our life is predetermined at birth and to what extent we are in control of our destiny.

How has the slow march of scientific research affected our concept of fate? On one hand, we know more about how genetics drives our lives, yet we also have more good evidence for things that we can do to shape our own outcomes.
This concept of fate and destiny has around since the Greeks – it threads through different cultures and is deeply rooted in the way that we speak today; for instance, we often say that babies are born destined for greatness.

If you ask long-term couples to think about their partner, their brain will react in the same way as a drug addict’s

Related: Scientists call for global moratorium on gene editing of embryos

Related: Scientists create decoder to turn brain activity into speech

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