Study reveals why we trust some strangers and not others

Study reveals why we trust some strangers and not others

Study reveals why we trust some strangers and not others 150 150 icnagency

By: Nicola Davis | Study reveals why we trust some strangers and not others | Neuroscience | The Guardian

Researchers probe how we make an initial judgment on whether to trust or cooperate with others

From getting into a taxi to asking a fellow train passenger to keep an eye on your luggage while buying a coffee, we’ve all put our trust in those we do not know.

Now researchers have revealed that strangers are more likely to be trusted if they look like someone who has earned your trust before – and more likely to be distrusted if they resemble someone who has betrayed your faith in them.

Related: Oxytocin: could the ‘trust hormone’ rebond our troubled world?

Related: Who do you trust? How data is helping us decide

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