To Be a Machine by Mark O’Connell review – solving the problem of death

To Be a Machine by Mark O’Connell review – solving the problem of death

To Be a Machine by Mark O’Connell review – solving the problem of death 150 150 icnagency

By: Paul Laity | To Be a Machine by Mark O’Connell review – solving the problem of death | Neuroscience | The Guardian

A captivating exploration of transhumanism features cryonics, cyborgs, immortality and the hubris of Silicon Valley

Max More runs Alcor, an American company which, in exchange for $200,000, will store your corpse in liquid nitrogen until the science exists to revive you. Tim Cannon is a computer programmer who implanted a device the size of a pack of cards into his arm, without the aid of anaesthetics. Zoltan Istvan recently ran for US president and publicised his campaign by driving across the country in a huge vehicle modified to look like a coffin.

These are among the unusual individuals Mark O’Connell interviews in his travelogue-style exploration of transhumanism, the movement that campaigns for the direct incorporation of technology into our bodies and minds, and strives to remove ageing as a cause of death. “What are my chances, would you say, of living to a thousand?” the author asks Aubrey de Grey, an established figure in this strange world: “I would say perhaps a little better than fifty-fifty,” is the serious reply. “It’s very much dependent on the level of funding.”

Conversational and approachable, To Be a Machine is an attempt to understand the transhumanist movement on its own terms

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