Why your brain is not a computer

Why your brain is not a computer

Why your brain is not a computer 150 150 icnagency

By: Matthew Cobb | Why your brain is not a computer | Neuroscience | The Guardian

For decades it has been the dominant metaphor in neuroscience. But could this idea have been leading us astray all along? By Matthew Cobb

We are living through one of the greatest of scientific endeavours – the attempt to understand the most complex object in the universe, the brain. Scientists are accumulating vast amounts of data about structure and function in a huge array of brains, from the tiniest to our own. Tens of thousands of researchers are devoting massive amounts of time and energy to thinking about what brains do, and astonishing new technology is enabling us to both describe and manipulate that activity.

We can now make a mouse remember something about a smell it has never encountered, turn a bad mouse memory into a good one, and even use a surge of electricity to change how people perceive faces. We are drawing up increasingly detailed and complex functional maps of the brain, human and otherwise. In some species, we can change the brain’s very structure at will, altering the animal’s behaviour as a result. Some of the most profound consequences of our growing mastery can be seen in our ability to enable a paralysed person to control a robotic arm with the power of their mind.

Related: Why can’t the world’s greatest minds solve the mystery of consciousness? | Oliver Burkeman

Continue reading…

icn-neurocience

Latest news and features from theguardian.com, the world’s leading liberal voice