David Eagleman: ‘The working of the brain resembles drug dealers in Albuquerque’

David Eagleman: ‘The working of the brain resembles drug dealers in Albuquerque’

David Eagleman: ‘The working of the brain resembles drug dealers in Albuquerque’ 150 150 icnagency

By: Andrew Anthony | David Eagleman: ‘The working of the brain resembles drug dealers in Albuquerque’ | Neuroscience | The Guardian

The neuroscientist, broadcaster and author on the evolution of the brain, the mystery of consciousnesss, and why the next generation will be much smarter than us

David Eagleman, 50, is an American neuroscientist, bestselling author and presenter of the BBC series The Brain, as well as co-founder and chief executive officer of Neosensory, which develops devices for sensory substitution. His area of speciality is brain plasticity, and that is the subject of his new book, Livewired, which examines how experience refashions the brain, and shows that it is a much more adaptable organ than previously thought.

For the past half-century or more the brain has been spoken of in terms of a computer. What are the biggest flaws with that particular model?
It’s a very seductive comparison. But in fact, what we’re looking at is three pounds of material in our skulls that is essentially a very alien kind of material to us. It doesn’t write down memories, the way we think of a computer doing it. And it is capable of figuring out its own culture and identity and making leaps into the unknown. I’m here in Silicon Valley. Everything we talk about is hardware and software. But what’s happening in the brain is what I call livewire, where you have 86bn neurons, each with 10,000 connections, and they are constantly reconfiguring every second of your life. Even by the time you get to the end of this paragraph, you’ll be a slightly different person than you were at the beginning.

Dreams are our way of defending ourselves against visual system takeover when the planet moves into darkness

We use 100% of our brain all the time. But the way that information is digested and fed can be very different

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